Read This!: WHERE FUTURES END by Parker Peevyhouse

Where Futures EndWhere Futures End by Parker Peevyhouse

Summary: Five teens.  Five futures.  Two worlds.  One ending.
One year from now, Dylan develops a sixth sense that allows him to glimpse another world. Ten years from now, Brixney must get more hits on her social media feed or risk being stuck in a debtors’ colony. Thirty years from now, Epony scrubs her entire online profile from the web and goes “High Concept.” Sixty years from now, Reef struggles to survive in a city turned virtual gameboard. And more than a hundred years from now, Quinn uncovers the alarming secret that links them all.  Five people, divided by time, will determine the fate of us all. These are stories of a world bent on destroying itself, and of the alternate world that might be its savior–unless it’s too late.

In this twisty mindbender of a book, Parker Peevyhouse gives us five interconnected stories, each set a little further in the future – a future where our world has become intertwined with an alternate one that brushes up against it. The choices of these five teens uncover the mystery of the Other Place more and more, until a choice is made that changes the fate of one world forever. As in any good sci-fi projection of the future, the parts of the book that are most chilling are those that are the most realistic: the way that Brixney, ten years from now, moves into a debtors’ colony with her brother after their parents die in an accident. The way that Epony, thirty years from now, has to remake herself online in order to survive. The way that Reef’s livelihood is pursuing credits in a virtual reality game that overlays the city of Seattle. The way that conglomerates like Microsoft-Verizon casually take over the world and push people out of their homes as the oceans rise due to global warming.

A sobering commentary on society, technology, and humanity’s penchant for making destructive choices.

WHERE FUTURES END is out now.

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